Monthly Archives: April 2014

Short paper to appear at IDC 2014 on user-defined gestures for children!

More work with my University of Maryland collaborators, including assistant professor Leah Findlater, has been accepted for publication! Look for our short paper “Understanding Child-Defined Gestures and Children’s Mental Models for Touchscreen Tabletop Interaction” to appear at the upcoming Interaction Design and Children (IDC) 2014 conference. We extended prior work by Jacob O. Wobbrock and colleagues in a paper from CHI 2009 on eliciting gesture interactions for touchscreen tabletops directly from users themselves; in our case, we asked children to define the gestures, and compared them to similar gestures designed by adults. Here is the abstract:

Creating a pre-defined set of touchscreen gestures that caters to all users and age groups is difficult. To inform the design of intuitive and easy to use gestures specifically for children, we adapted a user-defined gesture study by Wobbrock et al. [12] that had been designed for adults. We then compared gestures created on an interactive tabletop by 12 children and 14 adults. Our study indicates that previous touchscreen experience strongly influences the gestures created by both groups; that adults and children create similar gestures; and that the adaptations we made allowed us to successfully elicit user-defined gestures from both children and adults. These findings will aid designers in better supporting touchscreen gestures for children, and provide a basis for further user-defined gesture studies with children.

You can see the camera-ready version of the paper here. The conference will be held in Aarhus, Denmark (home of LEGO!). Unfortunately, I won’t be attending, but first-author (and graduating Master’s student) Karen Rust will present the paper at the conference. Look for her in the short paper madness session, and the poster session!

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ACM’s Computing Reviews acknowledges our CHI 2013 paper!

In April, I received a very nice email from Computing Reviews, a joint publication of the ACM and ThinkLoud, that our CHI 2013 paper “Analyzing User-Generated YouTube Videos to Understand Touchscreen Use by People with Motor Impairments” was acknowledged as a notable paper in computer science for 2013! Out of all the papers published in computer science in 2013, only 94 papers were acknowledged in this way. There is even a brief review summarizing the work and its expected impact as part of the honor. This work also received a ‘CHI Best Paper Award,’ an honor only the top 1% of papers appearing at that conference receives. I did that work while at UMBC, and my co-authors are from the University of Maryland (including assistant professor Leah Findlater). We are very proud of this paper, and we hope that this publicity will serve to broaden the scope of its impact, enabling further improvements to the accessibility of touchscreens, and other technologies, for adults and children with disabilities.

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