Projects

>Mobile Touch and Gesture Interaction for Children (MTAGIC)
On an NSF-funded project, my colleague Quincy Brown at Bowie State University and I are investigating differences in how children use touch and gesture interactions compared to adults, especially on mobile devices. We plan to explore adapting interfaces to work better with children in the real world. [Brown & Anthony, 2012, Anthony et al, 2012] Read more…

>$-Family of Gesture Recognizers
With Jacob Wobbrock at UW and now Radu-Daniel Vatavu at USV, I am developing a suite of simple, fast, accurate gesture recognition algorithms called the “$-family”. Our goal is to make accurate, robust recognition accessible without requiring special expertise. Try $N! Try $P! [Anthony & Wobbrock, 2010, 2012; Vatavu et al, 2012] Read more…

>Understanding Gestures (GECKo and GREAT)
GREAT-cropped I am studying patterns in how diverse users actually make gestures on touchscreen devices, and am developing tools and techniques to reveal these patterns. I have collaborated with multiple people on this line of inquiry: Jacob Wobbrock, Radu-Daniel Vatavu, Leah Findlater, and Quincy Brown. [Anthony et al, 2013a, Anthony et al, 2013b, Vatavu et al, 2013] Read more…

>Kinect Games for Exercise
This project is investigating exergames (“exercise games”) for older adults on the Microsoft Kinect platform. We are working with local seniors to consider their attitudes towards staying active, technology, and games in the design and development of our exergames. [Ganesan & Anthony, 2012] Read more…

>Multimodal Stress Detection (ended)
This project is exploring ways in which a system can detect, and then adapt to, user “stress” from variations in their input in multimodal interfaces. My collaborator is Andrew Sears at RIT. We are currently exploring what types of sensors, and what features from data collected by those sensors, will be most indicative of stress. [Anthony et al, 2011] Read more…

>Multimodal Algebra Equation Solving (ended)
My PhD thesis integrated handwriting interaction and intelligent tutoring systems for algebra. With my co-advisors, Ken Koedinger at CMU and Jie Yang now at NSF, I developed an interaction paradigm to accept handwriting input while limiting impact of recognition errors on the learning experience. [Anthony et al, 2012; Anthony et al, 2008; etc.] Read more…

>User-Centered Interfaces for Military End Users (ended)
My work with the User-Centered Interfaces group at Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories focused on applying advanced user interface technologies such as multimodal interaction and context-sensitive systems to the needs and requirements of the military end user. Read more…

>Rapid-Serial-Visual-Processing Interfaces for Video Search (ended)
During my internship at FXPAL, I was part of a team that designed and developed a Rapid-Serial-Visual-Processing (RSVP) interface for search and retrieval of video clips. The proof-of-concept application was the NIST TRECVID (Digital Video Retrieval) competition. [Adcock et al, 2008] Read more…

>Active Learning in Problem Solving (ALPS) (ended)
ALPS integrates intelligent tutoring systems with Synthetic Interview technology to allow students to type in any question in their own words and receive a pre-recorded video clip in response. I collected data on student question-asking patterns during tutoring and types of instruction that encourage more active question-asking. [Anthony et al, 2004] Read more…

>Evolving Board Evaluation Functions via Genetic Programming (Master’s Thesis) (ended)
For my Master’s thesis at Drexel University, I applied genetic programming (GP) techniques to developing intelligent agents to play a complex strategy-based game called Acquire. GP was used to evolve the strategy for evaluating potential moves by the agent players, contributing to computer science, machine learning and game theory. [Anthony, 2002] Read more…

>Conceptual Understanding and Prototyping (CUP) (ended)
As an undergraduate I worked on CUP, a 3D conceptual modeling system for assembly design. In engineering disciplines, the conceptual design phase focuses on the structure, behavior and function of an artifact. CUP was designed to allow engineers to capture the design intent during conceptual design without over-emphasis on geometry as in CAD. [Anthony, 2001] Read more…