Tag Archives: chi 2013

ACM’s Computing Reviews acknowledges our CHI 2013 paper!

In April, I received a very nice email from Computing Reviews, a joint publication of the ACM and ThinkLoud, that our CHI 2013 paper “Analyzing User-Generated YouTube Videos to Understand Touchscreen Use by People with Motor Impairments” was acknowledged as a notable paper in computer science for 2013! Out of all the papers published in computer science in 2013, only 94 papers were acknowledged in this way. There is even a brief review summarizing the work and its expected impact as part of the honor. This work also received a ‘CHI Best Paper Award,’ an honor only the top 1% of papers appearing at that conference receives. I did that work while at UMBC, and my co-authors are from the University of Maryland (including assistant professor Leah Findlater). We are very proud of this paper, and we hope that this publicity will serve to broaden the scope of its impact, enabling further improvements to the accessibility of touchscreens, and other technologies, for adults and children with disabilities.

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CHI 2013 talk posted!

The CHI 2013 conference was two weeks ago, and I presented a paper on work I did with a University of Maryland colleague, Leah Findlater, called “Analyzing User-Generated YouTube Videos to Understand Touchscreen Use by People with Motor Impairments.” We looked at YouTube as a source of data on users with physical disabilities telling their own stories about how they use touchscreen devices like tablets and smartphones in their daily lives. We also received a ‘Best Paper Award’ for this work! If you’re interested, you can find my presentation slides here.

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Come see our CHI 2013 Best Paper Award talk!

If you are in Paris at CHI 2013 this week, come see me present our ‘Best Paper Award’ winner “Analyzing User-Generated YouTube Videos to Understand Touchscreen Use by People with Motor Impairments” ! The talk will be on Tuesday, April 30th, from 11:20am to 11:40am in the Impairment and Rehabilitation session in room 242AB. Watch our video preview (narrated by my talented co-author Leah Findlater!) for a sneak peek:

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Two CHI 2013 workshop papers accepted!

My NSF-funded MTAGIC project will appear at two workshops at the upcoming CHI 2013 conference in Paris, France! The first is the RepliCHI workshop, which is focusing on what role replication studies can play in the HCI literature. In our paper “Challenges of Replicating Empirical Studies with Children in HCI,” we are presenting a series of empirical studies that we have run with different age groups over the past 18 months, essentially replicating a similar methodology. We will specifically describe how our methodology has had to be adapted to work with very young children. This will be a two-day workshop. For more information, check out the camera-ready version of our paper; here is the abstract for a quick overview:

In this paper, we discuss the challenges of conducting a direct replication of a series of mobile device usability studies that were originally conducted with adults and older children (ages 7 to 17). The original studies were designed to investigate differences in how adults and children use mobile devices to touch targets and create surface gestures. In this paper, we report on a replication we conducted with young children (ages 5 to 7). We discuss several methodological changes that were needed to elicit the same quality of data from the replication with young children as had been obtained from the older children and adults. The insights we present are relevant to the extension of empirical studies in HCI in general to younger children.

The second workshop is the Mobile Accessibility workshop, which is focusing on how to improve the accessibility of mobile devices to users with different abilities and to users in different contexts. In our paper “Towards Designing Adaptive Touch-Based Interfaces,” we are presenting our vision of how the work we’ve been doing on MTAGIC will lead to universally accessible mobile touchscreen interaction, by highlighting some of the technical extensions we believe our work points to. Again, for more information, check out our camera-ready paper, and here is the abstract:

As the use of mobile devices by non-typical users increases, so does the need for platforms that can support the unique ways in which these special users engage with them. We posit that, by developing an understanding of patterns in input behaviors for different user groups, we can design and develop interactions that support such non-typical users. We prove this technique with children: we present findings from two empirical studies showing how interaction patterns differ among younger children, older children, and adults. These findings point to a model of how to develop touch-based interactive technologies that can adapt to users of different ages or abilities. Such adaptations will serve to better support natural interactions by user populations with distinctive needs.

If you work in the area of kids and touch + gesture interaction, or mobile device interaction in general, find a MTAGIC project member at CHI and say hi!

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Upcoming papers to appear at CHI 2013, GI 2013, IDC 2013, and CHI 2013 best paper award!

February was a great month over here with lots of good news coming in about conference and journal paper acceptances! The MTAGIC project will be well-represented at the upcoming CHI 2013 conference, with two workshop papers accepted on different aspects of the project (the workshops are RepliCHI and Mobile Accessibility). We’ve also heard great news that two papers about our work with kids and mobile touchscreen devices will appear at IDC 2013 and in an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing!

In other news, my project with Jacob O. Wobbrock and Radu-Daniel Vatavu on using patterns in how people make surface gestures to inform the design of better gesture sets and gesture recognizers (e.g., the $-family of recognizers) will appear at GI 2013. And, last but not least, my side project with Leah Findlater on understanding how people with physical impairments, including children, are using mainstream mobile touchscreen devices in their daily lives will receive a ‘Best Paper Award’ at CHI 2013! This award is an honor only the top 1% of submissions receive, and we are very honored our work was selected to be among such great company.

Look for more details on each of these upcoming papers in blog posts throughout March and April, and you can already see them listed in my current CV if you are interested.

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CHI 2013 paper accepted on touchscreen use by people with physical impairments!

I’m pleased to announce that I have recently had a paper accepted to the upcoming CHI 2013 conference in Paris in May! This paper, entitled “Analyzing User-Generated YouTube Videos to Understand Touchscreen Use by People with Motor Impairments,” was written in collaboration with Leah Findlater, a professor of HCI at the University of Maryland (UMD), and Yoojin Kim, a Master’s student at UMD. We examined YouTube videos depicting people with physical impairments, including children, using touchscreen devices in order to understand the limitations and challenges these users are encountering.

Here’s the abstract:

Most work on the usability of touchscreen interaction for people with motor impairments has focused on lab studies with relatively few participants and small cross-sections of the population. To develop a richer characterization of use, we turned to a previously untapped source of data: YouTube videos. We collected and analyzed 187 non-commercial videos uploaded to YouTube that depicted a person with a physical disability interacting with a mainstream mobile touchscreen device. We coded the videos along a range of dimensions to characterize the interaction, the challenges encountered, and the adaptations being adopted in daily use. To complement the video data, we also invited the video uploaders to complete a survey on their ongoing use of touchscreen technology. Our findings show that, while many people with motor impairments find these devices empowering, accessibility issues still exist. In addition to providing implications for more accessible touchscreen design, we reflect on the application of user-generated content to study user interface design.

Here is the camera-ready version of this paper. See you in Paris!

***Note: we have learned that this paper will receive a CHI ‘Best Paper Award’! This award is an honor only the top 1% of submissions receive, and we are very honored our work was selected to be among such great company.

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